We Dream of Space

In We Dream of Space, the author takes us back to the Challenger disaster–but the book is not about that sad event, specifically. Instead, the book features a family in crisis. The three seventh graders (a set of twins and an older brother who was held back) come to terms with the hurdles in their own lives.

The Future of Us

The Future of Us is a thoughtful piece of fiction about what social media can really tell us about our lives (but also very pacey–this is a quick read because the story really moves). The story takes place in the late nineties (the ages of the characters matched my own at the time–so I found this incredibly satisfying as a blast through the past!).

Circus Mirandus

This middle grade work-of-art will spur the imagination of your young reader–but it may spur yours as well. As the novel follows a story set in both the past and present, you may be feeling like you want to go out and find a magical circus of your own!

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

I’d never read anything by Sherman Alexie before. The book was funny, heart-wrenching, and at times, shocking. Only a Native American could write such an honest piece with any authenticity, and I am forever grateful for the recommendation.

Rump: The True Story of Rumpelstiltskin

What’s in a name? Well, quite a bit in Shurtliff’s charming and engaging Rump: The True Story of Rumpelstiltskin.
The traditional character of Rumpelstiltskin is that of villain. What else could he be as a greedy, impish baby-stealer? But Shurtliff imagines him as a misunderstood protagonist.

Klawde

Klawde is irreverent, silly, and laugh-out-loud funny. But best of all, it has the same beautiful messages of friendship distilled in its pages that are found in my most favorite children’s novels.

What Light

This book by Thirteen Reasons Why author Jay Asher is a different kind of story from the hard-hitting bestseller. This light and beautiful Christmas story is classified as a middle grade plus, making it appropriate for young middle schoolers, all the way through high school.

Ten

Hello, Agatha Christie!

Now, it’s impossible to compare any murder mystery with some of the best by Agatha Christie. One of my favorites as a teen was And Then There Was None

The Night Gardener

It’s that time of year when we’re all ready for something a little spooky, right? Well, I’ve got a few scary ideas for you, but I definitely want to mention The Night Gardener.

Bone Gap

Haunting, cool, zany, funny, creepy, intriguing, thrilling. Laura Ruby’s Bone Gap are all these things.

I wasn’t sure what to expect when I read this for a writing critique group assignment. What I experienced was a book so extraordinary, I had this sense of beauty and unsettlement for days following.

Ghost

I had heard about the book Ghost and seen it during my weekly trips to the bookstore. However, when two fictional kids in The Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunrise (another great middle grade read) discussed it in the story, I checked it out at the library.

Sweep: The Story of a Girl and Her Monster

Sweep: The Story of a Girl and Her Monster is a tale that made me hold my breath, laugh, and cry.  Set in 1875 London, the novel will never let you think of chimney sweeps the same way. In fact, before your child digs into this story, you might have a quick conversation about what a chimney sweep did back when.